Mission Statement

Our Mission
We are a non-partisan, citizen-based network mobilized to promote the revitalization of our community by learning and building upon the best practices of other successful community models. We hope to inspire fellow residents, local businesses and our elected officials by partnering with them to creatively seek new solutions through Arts-Based Community Development and Creative Placemaking.

Thursday, May 23, 2019

Project Blackboard

Artists Are Turning Neglected Basketball Courts into Giant Works of Art
Click here to read the article

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Historic Photo Exhibit at Mark Anthony's Hair Cuts

J. Kenneth Leap: "In 1946 my grandparents opened their new food store on the corner of 2nd Ave and the Black Horse Pike in Runnemede. Today the building is occupied by the Polish American Deli and Mark Anthony’s Hair Cuts. Mark has allowed me to mount an exhibition of photos associated with the store’s grand opening. Stop in and visit! If your family’s from Runnemede check out the copy of the original customer list and look for your family name. Make sure you read the captions to find out who ate my Dad's pet chicken"

Barber Mark Santillo and Kenneth Leap

Mark Anthony's Hair Cuts and The Polish American Deli at 123 North Black Horse Pike

Leap's Food Store customer list from 1946

Friday, March 8, 2019

Behind the Scenes: Meet J. Kenneth Leap


Reimagine Runnemede meets on the 3rd Thursday of the Month at Leap's The Painted Window Stained Glass Studio at 109N Black Horse Pike in Runnemede

Why " Leap's"
J. Kenneth Leap
Heres a link to my CV

I'm on the Runnemede Planning Board

These were my parents Bill & Clare

My Dad loved canoeing in the NJ Pinelands

He wrote the History of Runnemede

He had his sign business in Runnemede for 26 years beginning on 6 West Second Avenue and then at 45 Lindsay Avenue

He attended Audubon Highschool and played football

When I was born he lettered "It's a Boy!" on his truck
He worked for my Grandfather at the family store on the corner of 2nd Ave and the Black Horse Pike in Runnemede

Both he and my grandfather kept horses at Sleeters, in Blackwood
  
Here is my Dad and my Grandfather, Jack

Another picture of my Dad and my Grandfather

My Dad served in the Korean War

He was stationed at Fort Dix in NJ

Here is some family history my Dad wrote about himself

These were my Grandparents, Jack and Ella Leap
This was their first grocery store at 121 North Black Horse Pike in Runnemede it opened in 1938
This was my Grandparents new grocery store on the corner of 2nd Avenue and the Black Horse Pike

When it opened in 1946 it was heralded as "The Most Modern Grocery Store in NJ" 

It was said to be the first store in the nation to use continuous fluorescent lighting placed end to end

My Grandfather was a prominent public figure in Runnemede



Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Reimagine Runnemede Website

Reimagine Runnemede has launched a new website. Find us online at http://www.reimaginerunnemede.org/

Save the Date Sunday March 31

Join Reimagine Runnemede for a field trip excursion to Cherry Street Pier for the Art Star Pop up Market. Cherry Street Pier is a year-round, mixed-use public space on the central Delaware River waterfront. Built into the shell of a century-old municipal pier, it is a reflection of Philadelphia today—creative, diverse, historic, adaptable, and inspired.
DETAILS

Monday, March 4, 2019

First sign of change toward a Better Mile


Reimagine Runnemede imagined a more welcoming message for the Black Horse Pike sign in front of the Library greeting our 20,000 daily commuters. Oh, the places you'll go. A Better Mile is coming.

"It's not about what it is. It's about what it can become!" - Dr. Seuss

Wednesday, February 20, 2019


Win $5,000 for your nonprofit organization by entering SJCA's ArtsTank: a South Jersey creative placemaking competition! The challenge is for South Jersey towns and municipalities to engage their communities through a creative placemaking proposal built on arts, history, and culture. The top 5 finalists will compete by making presentations to the creative placemaking experts or “sharks,” for the grand prize on May 29th!

Tuesday, February 5, 2019

How Façade Improvement Programs Can Benefit Your Community

Façade improvement programs are incentive programs created to encourage property owners and businesses to improve the exterior appearance of their buildings and storefronts. They focus on either commercial or residential properties in historic or non-historic areas and provide financial incentives such as a matching grant or loan, a tax incentive, and design assistance.
Read the full article. 

Sunday, February 3, 2019

Case study: Landscape transforms business corridor

King of Prussia (KOP) Business Improvement District (BID) hired Ground Reconsidered to design the new linear park along First Avenue, transforming underutilized lawn areas in front of office buildings into a cohesive, continuous, active and picturesque amenity. The demonstration linear park at 650 Park Avenue, completed in May 2017, serves as a catalyst for modernizing the entire corridor with a multi-use trail, horticulturally rich planting, solar-powered pedestrian lighting and programmed spaces. The park will unify multiple properties and provide a place for employees, residents, and visitors to meet, play and work. Designs for the full Linear Park are in development with construction slated for 2018.

KOP BID also hired Ground Reconsidered to transform barren traffic islands into lushly planted medians bringing year-round interest to these overlooked spaces, providing traffic calming and a reduction in littering. The firm’s design includes a plant palette tolerant of harsh, dry and seasonally salted conditions, comprised of grasses, perennials, shrubs, groundcovers as well as trees.

Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Focus on Tieton Mosaic

The Tieton Mosaic Project engages regional artists and artisans, local community members, K-12 students, business owners, and civic leaders in cycle of planning, education/apprenticeship, and hands-on art-making to accomplish twin goals: reinforce the character of Tieton with the bold design aesthetics of the vintage fruit labels, and establish a new self-sustaining artisan business. Tieton does not have a strong historical architectural tradition. Buildings are workmanlike cinderblock-style from the 1940-60s. However, the town itself has a clearly defined core, with a beautiful park surrounded by four blocks of storefronts. A modest amount of graphically distinct signage executed in traditional craft materials gives Tieton a distinctive identity. Based in Tieton, these businesses train and employ members of the community, marketing their products nationally within the incubator of Mighty Tieton. 


Reading list: Why some places thrive and others fail


Click here to read the full article: Why some places thrive and others fail

Excerpt: We live in a rapidly changing world. The post-recession economy is reshaping the way we live, work, shop and move around. Communities that prepare for the future will prosper. Those that do not will decline. Today people and businesses can locate anywhere. Communities that cannot differentiate themselves will simply have no competitive advantage. This means that quality of life is more important than ever. Successful communities set themselves apart. They know that place matters now, more than ever.